Thursday, June 11, 2015

SAMR Model

You can use SAMR to reflect upon how you are integrating technology into your classroom. Is it an act of Substitution? Augmentation? Modification? Or Redefinition?

SAMR is a framework through which you can assess and evaluate the technology you use in your classroom. Dr. Ruben Puentedura developed the SAMR model as a way for teachers to evaluate how they are incorporating technology into their instructional practice.

See the video below for an overview of the SAMR Model
https://www.commonsensemedia.org/videos/introduction-to-the-samr-model 


To learn more about the connections between SAMR and Bloom's Taxonomy, see Dr. Puentedura's blog post, "SAMR and Bloom's Taxonomy: Assembling the Puzzle."

SMAR - Enhancement to Transformation (teaching above the line)
Substitution In a substitution level, teachers or students are only using new technology tools to replace old ones, for instance, using Google Docs to replace Microsoft Word. the task ( writing) is the same but the tools are different.

Augmentation Though it is a different level, but we are still in the substitution mentality but this time with added functionalities. Again using the example of Google docs, instead of only writing a document and having to manually save it and share it with others, Google Docs provides extra services like auto saving, auto syncing, and auto sharing in the cloud.

Modification This is the level where technology is being used more effectively not to do the same task using different tools but to redesign new parts of the task and transform students learning. An example of this is using the commenting service in Google Docs, for instance, to collaborate and share feedback on a given task task.

Redefinition If you are to place this level in Blooms revised taxonomy pyramid, it would probably correspond to synthesis and evaluation as being the highest order thinking skills. "Redefinition means that students use technology to create imperceptibly new tasks. As is shown in the video below an example of redefinition is "when students connect to a classroom across the world where they would each write a narrative of the same historical event using the chat and comment section to discuss the differences, and they use the voice comments to discuss the differences they noticed and then embed this in the class website".

You can use technology to enhance and improve your teaching or more importantly to teach above the line (as illustrated below) where technology allows for transformation of teaching!

Another view of SMAR
Below is another video explaining the SAMR model in 120 seconds.
Link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=us0w823KY0g


How are you transforming your teaching with technology using the SAMR model?
Feel free to comment and link to examples of your work!

Notes/Tips:
Rubrics and Hyperdocs that support SAMR.


9 comments:

Lida Armstrong said...

The Spanish cooking project moved from the basic steps of substitution, augmentation, to the point of modification and then started to reach into the redefinition. The next step to enhance this project would be to collaborate with a classroom in a Hispanic country and perhaps have the students speak with each other face to face (Skype) to discuss the recipes and see true visual introductions to the Hispanic community and culture. In order for students to get the real flavor for the languages that they are studying it is imperative that they are exposed to the technology and have the support of the integration specialist to plan, implement and produce the project. I would highly recommend all language teachers take this next step into the technology available and the SAMR model and move above the line to transform their language classes and learning.

Diane O'Neil said...
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Diane O'Neil said...
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Laura Pagington said...

I have been in the Substitution and Augmentation levels of the SAMR model since I began teaching in 2002. I began moving into the Modification level of the SAMR model when Mary and I began working on modifying the existing Oral History Project in 2010. We took an existing project that used some forms of technology and modified it to be completely centered on Google and YouTube. Today, students create a website that will showcase their work as a portfolio, and then learn how to test, record, and upload a video to YouTube. Moving to the Redefinition stage has students using technology to create new tasks, and I did that this year when I began teaching College Prep United States History as a Project Based (PBL Course). Students created portfolios with Padlet and used YouTube Video Editor to create campaign videos as part of a unit on the 1960s. Using these tools has required my students to be creators versus consumers and made them take far greater ownership of their work.

Mrs. Carter's Nashoba English Blog said...

I have been working towards integrating technology into my classroom for the past 7 years, while focusing on the SAMR model. For example, I adapted our very primitive Journalism program to incorporate current technology using real world journalism as a model. I worked with students and a vendor to take our existing Google Website and transform it into an on-line newspaper, one that is very similar to the likes of a variety of professional news agencies. In addition, we brought our video news broadcasting into the 21st century by researching, specing out, and implementing a digital streaming news program. This allowed students to brainstorm, research, and develop a variety of skills that had real world connections.
I have taken many of my lessons and projects and have made them more mult-dimensional. I worked on with Mary Marotta was an identity project when I teach "The Namesake" by Jhumpa Lahiri. In the past I asked my American Lit students to look at their identity from a variety angles and to write about what contributes to their identity and to create a visual that supports their writing. Using the SAMR model, I adapted the assignment so that student created a wall using Padlet that reflected their identity in a variety of ways. I asked them to write a poem that was the centerpiece of their wall, but then had them use voice recorder or audacity to record themselves reciting their poems, which is much more powerful. I asked them to include Youtube clips that reflected their identity, to use 360cities.com to share the places that they have lived and visited and images that connect and enhance their poems. Students ultimately used a curration technique to produce an authentic product that asked them to make and present deeper connections through the use of technology.

Mrs. Carter's Nashoba English Blog said...

I have been working towards integrating technology into my classroom for the past 7 years, while focusing on the SAMR model. For example, I adapted our very primitive Journalism program to incorporate current technology using real world journalism as a model. I worked with students and a vendor to take our existing Google Website and transform it into an on-line newspaper, one that is very similar to the likes of a variety of professional news agencies. In addition, we brought our video news broadcasting into the 21st century by researching, specing out, and implementing a digital streaming news program. This allowed students to brainstorm, research, and develop a variety of skills that had real world connections.
I have taken many of my lessons and projects and have made them more mult-dimensional. I worked on with Mary Marotta was an identity project when I teach "The Namesake" by Jhumpa Lahiri. In the past I asked my American Lit students to look at their identity from a variety angles and to write about what contributes to their identity and to create a visual that supports their writing. Using the SAMR model, I adapted the assignment so that student created a wall using Padlet that reflected their identity in a variety of ways. I asked them to write a poem that was the centerpiece of their wall, but then had them use voice recorder or audacity to record themselves reciting their poems, which is much more powerful. I asked them to include Youtube clips that reflected their identity, to use 360cities.com to share the places that they have lived and visited and images that connect and enhance their poems. Students ultimately used a curration technique to produce an authentic product that asked them to make and present deeper connections through the use of technology.

Ann DeCristofaro said...

I have used technology since the early computers in the 1980's within my curriculum. Students have done projects ranging from real-life consumer simulations, to art and its relationship in mathematics. Now that technology has matured, we use it daily in the classroom - students use Desmos calculators to add sliders to their equations to explore the effect of modifying coefficients, solve problems by refining tables and explore transformations in their equations. Last year, a student used Excel with VB Programming to calculate the effect of declining balances on credit cards. The equations in some cases used logarithms and they were compared to the results obtained by arithmetic brute force using Excel columns.

The students beg to do more problems (some math IS drill, you know!) by using Kahoot - a computer game with a leaderboard and scores - and the growth is very evident when I look at the spreadsheets that it generates - with their times for answering, their accuracy, etc. In one class, problems that used to take 2 minutes to solve (with many wrong answers) have nearly 100% accuracy as the kids now take less than 20 seconds to solve them. Drill may be old-school, but it works! And this has translated to success in the classroom for some students where before the lack of basic skills hindered their further growth.

I model what I expect them to do in mathematics every day. I have a math blog at http://anndeemath.blogspot.com/ Check it out!

Jennifer Panarelli said...

I have been working towards integrating technology into my classroom for the past 10 years. For example, in the freshman curriculum, I have modified traditional journal responses and non-fiction writing assignments in a couple of different ways. Previously, students would submit hand-written, or typed responses to literature, receive feedback from me, and then the assignment would be over. There was no real room for reflection or revision.

More recently, with Google Docs, I required students to submit their responses to me as shared documents. With commenting privileges, I could provide feedback and students could immediately view my comments and revisit the assignments and feedback as needed. I could also more easily require students to revise assignments as they and I could view previous versions and previous feedback to see the changes and progress that was needed and had been made. The modifications possible through Google Docs provided many benefits that weren't previously available through Microsoft Word alone.

This year I feel like a lot of tools have come together. With Google Classroom, I have an easier way to collect assignments, record grades, and provide feedback. Additionally, this year I have incorporated an activity called group conferencing whereby every student in the class has use of a Chromebook on the day that a draft of a writing assignment is due. One or two students volunteer to share their work. I post one of the shared assignments from my Google Drive and the whole class critiques that assignment by providing constructive feedback. The writer can make changes as we work through the piece. Others in the class can look over their own writing, notice areas where they too can make improvements and edit their own writing as needed.

Essentially, what used to be an assignment that allowed for no reflection has become a very reflection-oriented assignment that creates whole class discussions about the writing process allowing everyone in the class to benefit from the process and the advancements in technology that have made the process possible. The writing process has been redefined through the way I provide feedback and make students responsible for giving feedback. And the expectations I have for revisions have increased dramatically based on the time I spend working with students during this dynamic redefined technology-inspired writing process.

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